Scabies in the Elysée Palace? How Disposable Sheets and Linens can Prevent a Public Heath Disaster

Well, honestly we never expected disposable sheets would be the next big thing to hit Paris’ Elysée Palace, where the President of France resides. Surprisingly, an article that originated in a Parisian daily paper, 20 Minutes (then reprinted and rebroadcast by all the major media outlets of the capital), about a year ago details the poor hygiene conditions that the President’s Republican Guards must endure, merely to accomplish their jobs.

“Three Cases of Scabies at the Elysée” by William Molinié
The Elysée Palace and the dust mite scabei, a mite responsible for scabies

HEALTH – It all started with three private level officers who worked at the palace… A disease that puts a nasty damper on the prestige of the gold-plated presidential palace. “Three suspected cases of scabies were reported during the summer on three sub-officers at the Elysée Palace,” said the Press Secretary for the President of the Republic.

This highly contagious skin disease is most often caught by the homeless who live in the most difficult of conditions. “Indeed, there have been some instances [of Scabies] in the Elysée because of the dilapidated condition of the premises,” confirmed the Association for Military Rights Advocacy.

“The plaster walls are falling apart”
According to official military sources who wish to remain anonymous, “the plaster walls are falling apart into pieces” and “some policemen are sleeping in linen closets that are never aired out.” The bedding is also “almost never changed” and the guards have to provide their own investment “in disposable sheets.” From the point of view of the President, he wants to reassure the public. “Renovations of the rooms have been undertaken to reduce overcrowding, a main factor that contributes to this disease,” he claimed.

 

from Caractère Paris

Waterproof Mattress Covers

Let’s just say the misfortune of the Republican Guard has put a spotlight on our core business, disposable linens and bedsheets. The disposable sheet was invented to avoid the risk of spread of diseases and infections, especially in hospitals, nursing homes and day cares. It was quickly adopted by other accommodations, such as hotels, rural country cottages, camp sites, bed and breakfasts, inns, guest houses and boarding schools. The first few generations of the products were uncomfortable and noisy, often causing guests to disturb themselves with the sound of their own shifting positions in the middle of the night. However, today’s innovations in non-woven fabric technology have revolutionised disposable linens with ultra-thin waterproof layers, increasing their comfort, softness and hospitality. The Nuideal Tranquil Night Mattress Cover, for instance, guarantees waterproof protection while also feeling every bit as soft as high thread count cotton. These waterproof covers and mattress pads are already used by luxury hotels that must ensure they always provide impeccably clean beds and proper service to demanding clients.

Thanks to constantly evolving technology, nonwoven fabrics can mean time and cost

from Caractère Paris

Waterproof Mattress Pads

savings for hotel owners and managers who won’t have to worry anymore about washing and drying reusable products, nor the high water and electricity bills that accompany these processes, nor having to deal with expensive bleaching and spot-removal services. What’s more, disposable sheets are 100% recyclable. Some are even biodegradable, which means minimal to no environmental impact, often at a much lower cost than reusable products.

Browse Caractère’s full collection via the following link: http://disposable-linen.co.uk/bed-sheet-towelling-bedding/index.html

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