Leading Provider in Hotel and Spa Linens Debuts ‘Emergency’ Swimsuit for Guests

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Leading Provider in Hotel and Spa Linens Debuts ‘Emergency’ Swimsuit for Guests

(Paris, France) — (July 22 2015) As a leading provider of disposable linens since 1993, Caractère Paris has developed a new line of disposable swimwear that is affordable for guests.

Spare 2-Piece Bikini for massageTypically, only the finest hotels come equipped with spare bathing suits, but thanks to Caractère Paris, hotels and spas can be ready when asked for an ‘emergency swimsuit’ by guests. Made of high-quality, soft, stretchy polyester with Spandex (elastane), these non-disposable swimsuits are fit for even the most chlorinated pools or the saltiest seawater.

“Believe it or not, even during summer time, 20% of all hotel guests arrive having forgotten entirely about swimwear. Most of them being men,” explains Emmanuel Gohet, who is the Marketing Manager for Caractère Paris. “It’s always a bit embarrassing for the guests, but they always ask the receptionist if they have something to borrow or to buy to jump in the swimming pool during  the seasonal hot weather. We’ve worked to provide an affordable solution for hospitality service providers.”

The swimsuits are offered in three different styles including:

  • Two piece bikini: Triangular cups with discreet padding and extra breast support, and a comfortable white lining in the bra and crotch area. Ties around the neck and on both hips, which ensures a secure and adjustable fit.
  • One piece: Scoop-cut back, with discreet padding and extra breast support, and a comfortable white lining in the bra and crotch area. Brief-style Shorts – Stretchy; lined with a comfortable, protective layer of white mesh fabric, an elastic waistband and a tie-cord.
  • Boxer-style shorts: Lower thigh length, lined with a comfortable, protective layer of soft white mesh fabric and an elastic waistband to ensure a secure and pleasing fit.

All suits are made from 95% Polyester and 5% Spandex elastane, with fibers intermeshed for a comfortable fit. Prices vary from €32.28 to €38.88 for a pack of 6 that includes two suits for men, two for women and 2 for kids from sizes XS to 4XL to accommodate the diversity of guests.

“Unlike most companies, we offer the bathing suits in just one color, black. This ensures a stylish, comfortable and practical swimwear look through its classic color, allowing to keep costs low for purchasers and guests who purchase them as well.”

Whether it be a complimentary item or sold to guests of resorts, spas and public pools, Caractère Paris’s latest luxury style swimsuits adhere to regulation and dress codes that do not permit the use of other, more risqué or loose cut swimwear, providing a prime solution for hotels and guests alike. Priced at about £5 each, hospitality companies now have affordable and functional options that allow both profit and added customer service to guests in need of a swimsuit.

About the company:

Founded in 1993, Caractère Paris is a French manufacturer of disposable linens that services the hospitality industry and service providers throughout Europe, mainly markets in France and Germany. They are a trusted company with prestigious clients such as Hilton International and Accor Hotel, with a strong presence on the web with online direct sales for small B&B, beauty parlors and boutiques.

For media inquiries regarding Caractère Paris, those interested are encouraged to contact the company’s Marketing Manager, Emmanuel Gohet directly at + 33 1 49 89 01 83 or via email at emmanuel.gohet@caractere-paris.com. To learn more about the company or their line of disposable bathing suits, please visit: www.disposable-linen.co.uk or and disposable swimwear

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An explosion of Chinese tourists: The potential and expectations of Chinese travellers in the UK and worldwide

Relative newcomers to international tourism market, the Chinese traveler is the new target for a tourism industry that suffered major losses during the crisis. Thanks to a bustling local economy and the government’s relaxation of travel restrictions, in 2013 Chinese tourists took a total of 97 million trips abroad and spent some $102 billion, becoming the “world’s biggest spenders” according to a report by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). A study conducted by the Chinese government predicts those figures will rise to over 100 million overseas voyages by 2015, and 200 million by 2020.

Taken in perspective with the recent past, these numbers represent a spectacular amount of growth, when in 2004 only 29 million went overseas. However, when isolated on a per-country basis, the growth can seem even more shocking. For instance, the number of Chinese tourists who visited Thailand last year more than doubled over the year before.

According to Abagail Haworth of The Guardian, the Chinese tourist represents “a global phenomenon, an unstoppable trend, a lucrative opportunity… Now millions are on the move.” CNN labeled the new found market, “the biggest phenomenon to hit the global travel industry since the invention of commercial flight.” International travel has been growing among the Chinese over the past decade, with rising prosperity at home and the relaxation of Communist government travel restrictions.

So aside from the economic and political explanations, why are so many Chinese flocking abroad? The firm Morgan Stanley predicts that in two years, Chinese tourists could spend $194 billion on vacations abroad, much of it on luxury products. Despite government policy to encourage spending at home, Chinese flock abroad in droves to take advantage of the lower prices on foreign designer products. This is because the government imposes import duties and taxes that can mean an additional 60% added to the price one would find in another country. A researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences called his compatriots “walking wallets,” due to the amount they’ve become known to spend abroad.

Thus it becomes clear why London, Paris and Hong Kong have become favorite destinations for the Chinese: luxury shopping. To put things into perspective, by 2015 the total amount of spending from Chinese abroad will exceed total sales of luxury goods worldwide, when compared to 2008 when it represented solely one third of that figure. A government crackdown implemented two years ago reinforced this phenomenon, as the growth in the domestic luxury market grew a mere 6%, whereas Chinese luxury spending abroad increased 37% over the preceding year. Some sectors, such as high end liquor and watches even saw a decline in sales.

This potential market has inspired Paris to invest in a manual for the city of light’s business owners to better understand the new wave of boutique-obsessed clientele. French-speaking guides do their best to meander giant tour groups through the crowds at department stores and on high streets. They much watch out for the guests, who have become an easy target for pickpockets and other criminals. New campaigns have begun by tourism officials to raise awareness among tourists of the dangers of dressing conspicuously and showing fancy electronics or jewellery in public. In London, the famous department store Harrod’s has hired 70 Mandarin-speaking employees. An additional one hundred China Unionpay registers permit direct payments by Chinese tourists from their home bank accounts.

The growing presence of Chinese tourists comes along with it a greater exposure and international visibility. However, surveys about the perception of tourists worldwide do not characterize Chinese tourists in a very positive light. One analyst even called them the world’s new “ugly” tourists. While self-organized trips are on the rise, the majority of international travel still occurs in tourist groups. Sociologists believe this “increases their collective visibility and amplifies stereotypes and cultural unfamiliarity on both sides” by limiting individual interactions between the tourists and locals. Media reports flourish about the negative impression left by Chinese tourists, that they “are loud and rude, or that they refuse to queue or give tips…”

Other complaints range from the practical to the surreal. In July, residents of the small Swiss city of Lucerne protested that up to 120 Chinese tour buses a day were paralysing local traffic, as they deposited tourists who wanted to buy luxury watches. Then there were bizarre reports, picked up by the Chinese media, of competing Chinese honeymooners brawling in French lavender fields over the best spot for photos to capture a “Monet moment”. A group travelling to North Korea drew scorn for throwing sweets to children as though they were “feeding ducks”, while a number of Chinese tourists in the Maldives were reportedly caught giving fake marriage papers to upmarket resorts in order to get free dinners offered to newlyweds.”

Beijing has been so bothered by the potentially negative perception of its people in other countries that the government has instituted a new clause that applies to Chinese citizens specifically when they travel abroad. Section 13 of the new bill states, “Tourists shall respect public order and social morality in tourism activities, respect the local customs, cultural traditions and religious beliefs, take care of tourism resources, protect the ecological environment and respect the norms of civilised tourist behaviours.”

In terms of which countries can benefit from the growth in demand of accommodations and travel services, Thailand tops the list. For a mere £500, Chinese tourist can spend a week in the country with an organized tour, with flights included. The combination of historically and architecturally significant temples, pristine beaches and duty-free shopping brings Chinese here for the first time, if not on return trips. In fact, Thailand ranks as number three on a list of the most visited foreign destinations by Chinese, not far behind the “satellite Chinese territories” Hong Kong and Macao. London still leads at the top destination in terms of cities, but faces a threat from Bangkok, quickly gaining steam as a potential replacement.

uk colour flip flop

Disposable slippers from Caractere

What does this profound change in visitor composition mean for hotel, resort and Bnb operators? First of all, they’ll have to adapt to Chinese cultural standards. Since the ability to travel abroad for a Chinese person already assumes a certain standard of living and income level, one can expect that these travelers will not be the easiest to please. Standards for hygiene vary quite a bit in Eastern Asian from those typical of Europe or on other continents.

How can managers of accommodations adapt? By trying disposable products, of course!

At Caractère, we make a variety of popular disposable slipper and sandal solutions to prevent the spread of infections on the floors of hotels, resorts, salons, saunas, showers, locker rooms, changing areas, baths, pools, hot tubs, spas, etc.

Disposable bath robe

Bathrobe by Caractere

Another favorite product in finer establishments is our popular line of luxurious Bath robes, available in several designs. For perfect hygiene and the ultimate protection of your clientele (not to mention your business investment), try our other disposable, recyclable solutions, and discover the reason why we’re the buzz of the most luxurious hotels of Paris, the world capital of fashion and design. Our products will be sure to meet the standards of even the most difficult to please clients, including Chinese tourists on luxury shopping sprees.

Sources
Haworth, Abigail. “Chinese tourism: ‘Finally, we are seeing the world.’” The Observer, Dec. 22, 2013
http://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/2013/dec/22/chinese-tourism-changing-the-world
Kuo, Lily. “By 2015, Chinese tourists could spend more than all the world’s luxury shoppers combined.” QZ.com, Nov. 15, 2013.
http://qz.com/147703/by-2015-chinese-tourists-could-spend-more-than-all-the-worlds-luxury-shoppers-combined
M., K. “Chinese tourists: Mind your manners.” The Economist, Nov. 6, 2013.
http://www.economist.com/blogs/analects/2013/11/chinese-tourists
“‘Walking wallets’: Chinese tourists the world’s biggest travellers.” The Sydney Morning Herald, Jan. 10, 2014
http://www.smh.com.au/travel/travel-news/walking-wallets-chinese-tourists-the-worlds-biggest-travellers-20140110-30lce.html

Legionellosis or Legionnaire’s Disease in Spa and wellness centre

Are you the owner or manager of a spa, hot tub or pool, or do you provide showers and air conditioning for your clients? Make sure you are fully aware of the dangers of legionnaire’s disease and the risks to your clients, and understand what your legal obligations are.

What exactly is Legionnaire’s Disease?

legionella

Legionnaire’s disease is a serious disease caused by a tiny aquatic organism which thrives in warm, damp environments. It can be inhaled in fine droplets, leading to pneumonia and a high fever. As the disease takes up to 10 days to develop many other people may be infected before it is realised that anything is amiss. Air conditioning systems, humidifiers, nebulisers, ornamental fountains and many other types of equipment containing water may also be sources of legionnaire’s disease.

How can it be prevented?

 

A spare swimsuit for pool to keep the pool clean.

Because of its long incubation period an outbreak is easier to prevent than to control and there are strict regulations in place to safeguard public health. The essential feature is a controlled system of regular testing and keeping water systems clean. Although legionella bacteria can be found in many sources, including fresh water, it becomes dangerous when slime is allowed to develop and when the temperature reaches 35-45 degrees centigrade.

What are my legal obligations?

According to www.hse.gov.uk, under general Health and Safety law you are obliged to maintain your water systems in good condition and assess the risk of a problem developing. This means drawing up a risk assessment, identifying potential sources of legionnaire’s disease and preparing a course of action to monitor that risk. You must keep accurate records and be able to prove you are taking your responsibilities seriously.

The Notification of Cooling Towers and Evaporative Condensers Regulations state that if you have a cooling tower or evaporative condenser on site you must notify the local authority in writing. Contact your local Environmental Health department.

 

What should I do on a daily basis?

disposable flip flop for pool and spa

If you employ five people or more, you must have a written risk assessment and keep careful records of your monitoring of the water system. Make sure you have a responsible person do this and that all your staff know the correct way to use equipment.

Keep the system and the water clean, and avoid a situation where an outbreak could develop. Keep the water too hot for the bacteria to survive or add an antibacterial solution to prevent growth.

Consider employing a firm of consultants to check your supply.

How to Avoid Plantar Warts and Athlete’s Foot with Easy, Elegant Salon and Spa Hygienic Slipper Prevention Solutions

from Caractère Paris

A Severe Plantar Wart

Plantar Warts (Verruca Plantaris) and Athlete’s Foot (Trichophyton foot fungus) are two nasty buggers that arise from time to time on the floors of even the most luxurious salons, fitness centres and spas. Both can cause pain, itching, discomfort and embarrassment for their unwilling hosts, and can last quite a wide range of time, from a few days to months or even years when left untreated or improperly treated. Once clients become infected with these diseases, they can ruin the reputation of a business, especially in this day and age of word of mouth testimonials and online customer reviews. Even if your salon adheres to the highest standards of cleanliness and hygiene, disinfecting your floors on a daily basis can be impossible and/or prove ineffective in preventing the spread of these two insidious bugs. Why jeopardise your business and risk law suits when a few easy steps can mean total protection, both for your clients and you, not to mention the ease of mind that will come in knowing that a relaxing day at the spa doesn’t have to turn into a nightmare for your guests.

from Caractère Paris

A more mild case of a Plantar Wart

First, if you’ve never heard of or had a case of Plantar Warts, consider yourself lucky! The warts, which are also considered benign epithelial tumours, are caused by a highly infectious form of the human papillomavirus that spreads easily on wet surfaces, such as the floors of lockerrooms, baths, showers, pool decks, spas, salons, hot tubs and other spaces with frequent water exposure and/or high foot traffic. It is estimated that up to ten percent of the general population is infected with the warts at any given time. Thanks to HPV’s high resilience and contagiousness, it can survive many months on a surface without the need for a host, making it a pesky challenge to conquer, especially in large salons or ones with intricate tilework that can prove hard (if not impossible) to clean.

from Caractère Paris

A Cluster of Plantar Warts

These painful warts transfer under the skin surface through direct contact with microscopic cuts and abrasions, often invisible to the naked eye. They often take weeks or months to appear visibly, usually located on the bottom surface of feet, such on as the underside of the toe or sole. They can cause pain, itchiness and irritation, which is driven deeper and deeper into the foot due to the pressure exerted on the surface of the foot from walking. To cure the warts, one may apply adhesive such as duct tape to “suffocate” them, use various acids to remove the top layer of skin, or seek expensive laser treatments.

In severe cases, if left untreated, the warts can spread into groups called mosaic warts and become extremely painful, requiring surgical removal through liquid nitrogen application or cauterisation, and for the victim to be hospitalised! The side effects of this sort of treatment usually include scaring and sometimes trouble walking. Studies have shown that even in mild cases, the form of treatment does not make much of a difference in healing time. Therefore, the best cure is prevention, which according to Wikipedia,

from Caractère Paris

Surgically removed Plantar Wart

Because plantar warts are spread by contact with moist walking surfaces, they can be prevented by not walking barefoot in public areas such as showers or communal changing rooms (wearing flip flops or sandals helps), not sharing shoes and socks, and avoiding direct contact with warts on other parts of the body or on other people. Humans build immunity with age, so infection is less common among adults than children.

The British National Health Service even recommends taking the following precautions:

  • cover them with an adhesive bandage while swimming,
  • wear flip-flops when using communal showers,
  • and should not share towels.
from Caractère Paris

Athlete’s Foot

Second, Athlete’s Foot constitutes another, often more common, but fortunately less severe problem for clients who frequent establishments with wet surfaces. Known as Ringworm of the foot, Athlete’s Foot is in fact a fungus that can cause scaling, flaking, dryness and itchiness in the infected area, again often the result of walking barefoot in moist or damp areas. It can also be transferred through the sharing of towels, shoes, socks or other footwear, especially if it has not been properly washed or disinfected between users. Though it generally affects the underside of feet, it can also spread all over the body, including to the person’s genitals. It is an opportunistic disease, meaning it can privilege the cross infection of other diseases, which then require oral antibiotics to resolve. Those with delicate immune systems may also experience the so-called “id reaction,” which manifests itself with blisters that cover the entire body. Pain, swelling, inflammation and scaring as a result of itching can also be counted among the possible symptoms.

from Caractère Paris

Athlete’s Foot Side View

Careful visual inspection of the skin will determine whether such an infection is Athlete’s Foot or a similar skin disease, such as eczema or psoriasis, and the appropriate course of treatment. Unlike with the infamous warts, Athlete’s Foot has several possible cures. First, because the fungi thrive in moist, warm areas, it is important to ensure the feet remain as dry and cool as possible. About a third of cases will solve themselves with the appropriate hygiene measures.

playa slippers

Topical treatments such as talcum powder and diaper rash ointments may also be applied to speed the recovery of mild cases. Pharmacies also offer a variety of medicated anti-fungal creams and oral medications for extreme cases, but again, physicians caution that most incidents will solve themselves with the appropriate hygiene measures taken. Natural treatments, such as Tea Tree Oil and Ajoene may also prove useful, but little research has been done in this area.

from Caractère Paris

Black Slippers

Regardless of the severity of Plantar Warts and Athlete’s Foot, the best treatment method is of course prevention. That’s why at Caractère, we make a variety of disposable slipper and sandal solutions to prevent the spread of infections on the floors of salons, saunas, showers, locker rooms, changing areas, baths, pools, hot tubs, spas, etc.

For perfect hygiene and the ultimate protection of your clientele (not to mention your business investment), try our disposable, recyclable solutions, and discover the reason why we’re the buzz of the most luxurious hotels of Paris, the world capital of luxury, fashion and design.

uk colour flip flop

Flip flip to keep foot clean

Recycling and Respect for the Environment Surge in the Hotel Industry: Three Simple Ways to Save Money and Earn the Respect of Guests

In the cutthroat hotel industry, price and the bottom line often trump other concerns, especially those for the environment. However, must it be this way? With three innovative and brilliant ideas, industry leaders such as Travelodge, the Crown Spa Hotel and the Accor Group are showing how changes from the smallest detail (light bulbs) to more major ones (construction materials) can both make a world of difference and save unbelievable amounts of money. Now, both Mother Nature and your bank account can smile at the same time!

Starting from Scratch with Recycled Building Materials

 

from Caractère

Uxbridge Container Hotel

First, the hotel’s construction can be rethought of as a method of recycling. Sushil Cheema of The Wall Street Journal reported at the end of 2008 about a new innovation in hotel building design: the first hotel ever built in the UK entirely out of former shipping containers. While most people cannot imagine spending a night inside of an empty tin box, Travelodge found a method to renovate the containers in Shenzen, China (their place of origin), ship them halfway around the world and assemble them together in a solid structure in Uxbridge, a suburb of London. Instead of the roughly fifteen month to two year construction period that a traditional hotel of this size would take, the company managed to finish the project in a matter of four months, including the time it took to pour the foundation. Once the site was ready, it only took 20 days to piece together the 86 containers into a coherent design. A spokesman for Travelodge, Greg Dawson, commented that this new method eases concerns about disturbing the surrounding area during construction. With pre-fabricated units, the contractor, Verbus Systems, just snapped them together “like giant Lego blocks,” without interrupting shoppers at the nearby high street.

 

from Caractère

Interior of the Container Hotel

Despite the fact that the company accomplished major savings by choosing this unconventional building method, they can charge the same prices for rooms as at any other location, and eco-friendly or design engaged tourists may flock to the site just to learn more about how it was built. For Travelodge, which plans to open a new hotel in the UK once a week for the next ten years, the shipping container idea will help the chain achieve its growth targets without worry. Uxbridge’s location was nothing more than a test site: the company completed a similar project at Heathrow Airport later that year.

Read more about the “Hotel Made of Shipping Containers Opens in England,” at http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/2008/08/27/hotel-made-of-shipping-containers-opens-in-england/
For an interesting collection of pictures of container re-use, see http://xhadong.wordpress.com/

Together, Several Small Changes Can Go Quite a Long Way

Second, if your establishlment is already built, don’t fret, because it’s not too late! Adapting exisiting buildings and their infrastructure to new developments in the energy and appliance industries can lead to profound changes in the site’s energy use – and deep savings for your pocketbook! Managers have found that many guests tend to leave the lights or a TV on when they leave the room in order to feel more welcomed when they return. Even more guests forget to turn off the heat or air conditioning when they check out, augmenting energy bills to acclimate an empty room. EnjoyEngland.com, in partnership with The Telegraph, points out that Scarborough’s Crown Spa Hotel has retrofitted its 116 rooms and suites with an automatic switch that turns off non-essential lights and appliances the moment one leaves the room. Of course this change took some initial investment, but even simple changes at the four star establishment — like replacing conventional light bulbs with LED lights in parts of the building — have provided incredible energy savings. In fact, starting in 2011, the hotel will see a quarter of a million pound (£250,000) reduction per year on its annual energy bill.

 

from Caractère

Crown Spa Hotel

Aside from energy savings, the hotel also started collecting rain water from the roof to wash its linens and flush toilets, began composting kitchen waste and switched to a wood-burning stove to heat the lobby. The staff has been told to turn off computers and lights while on break or lunch, and the caretakers added a special, non-toxic, heat-insulating chemical to the pool to reduce overnight cooling. After this series of little changes, the hotel has already seen dramatic cuts in CO2 emissions, and aims to halve its emissions by 2015. The hotel’s administrative director, David Frank, commented he’s an “evangelical ‘greenie’ and [that he’s] proud to be one… We don’t ram our message down people’s throats but sustainability is efficiency and it makes good economic and business sense to think about sustainability.”

Read more about “The Crown Spa Hotel’s green credentials impressed the Enjoy England judges enough to pick up the Sustainable Tourism Award,” at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sponsored/travel/enjoy_england_trips/7658371/Enjoy-England-The-Crown-Spa-Hotel.html

Special Events to Transform Consumer Consciousness, Brand Perception and the World’s Quality of Life

Starting this Friday, the Accor Group of hotels will innaugurate the fifth edition of its annual Earth Guest Day. David Woods of HR Magazine writes that the holiday was created in 2006 with eight guiding principles:

  • Contributing to local development
  • Fighting against epidemics
  • Promoting balanced food
  • Managing energy consumption
  • Conserving water
  • Producing less waste
  • Protecting biodiversity

Locations and staff across the 90 countries with Accor locations, including the 160 hotels in the UK, will celebrate the occassion with a series of events, such as tree plantings in parks, gardens, schools and other public areas across the country to bring attention to its Fruits for the Children campaign, a partnership between the charity Plan UK and Accor’s Plant for the Planet foundation. The goals of this particular campaign include the following:

Fruits for Children is a project to improve the nutrition of 4,000 school children from 8 schools in the Machakos district of Kenya through planting fruit trees to provide a steady year-round supply of nutritious fruits to improve their diet. The project also aims to develop children’s knowledge of their environment, and their skills and techniques in fruit production, improving their standards of living as the acquired skills are transferred to their families and communities. The trees also help to reduce the problem of soil erosion and the fruits produced provide a source of income for the participating schools.

 

from Caractère

An Accor Ibis Hotel

Through the previous years’ efforts, Accor already raised more than £100,000 in the UK for Fruits for the Children. Plant for the Planet dates from 2009, a program instituted by the chain’s headquarters to finance the replanting of depleted forests worldwide. Thus far, over 1.7 million trees have been planted, with the UK Accor locations financing the planting of 30,000 trees in 2010 alone. The system is rather simple, but will leave a lasting impression on the plant, animal species and families who call these forests home, in addition to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Every five times guests reuse a bath towel without requiring its wash, the company vows to plant a tree. The goal for 2011 in the UK is an astounding 50,000 trees, nearly twice as many as last year.

Read more about “Accor Hotel Group employees gear up for global environmental initiative,” at http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/hro/news/1019312/accor-hotel-group-employees-gear-global-environmental-initiative

Lessons Learned

As you can see, everything from minute changes in supplies or practices to ways to rethink construction methods can reduce a hotel’s environmental impact, in addition to the charges it must pay. At Caractère, we celebrate the efforts of the hotel industry to reduce its environmental impact by guaranteeing that all of our products, such as the famous bed mattress covers, sanitary headphone covers, and salon products like sandals; are reusable, recyclable or biodegradable. We design our products with ecological pricipals in mind so they are manufactured out of mostly plant-based materials with a minimal amount of chemical treatments and dyes.

In addition, over the coming months, we aim to reduce our carbon footprint by relocating our offices to a location much closer to our shipping providers, and also easier for our staff to make the commute via mass transit. The world is constantly evolving, and just like you, we care about the envionment too!

Caractère’s Spring Newsletter: Swimwear, Bedding and Sandals

Disposable Swimsuits – Welcome Slippers – Hotel Mattress Pad Protectors

n°02 – 23/03/2011
Emergency disposable Swim Wear
Emergency Swim Wear

– Better than disposable bathing suits,

these simple and elegant swimsuits are for customers of all sizes who forget their own at home.

You can offer them for free or sell them.

The unit price of less than £5 makes these suits a great deal.

An important service for guests who value comfort and convenience.

To learn more, please click here.

Slippers for all Sizes and Sensibilities

-Welcome slippers have become an essential amenity for accommodations that provide all the comforts of home.

-In addition to custom orders (starting with 20 pairs), we offer a wide range of slipper sizes, in white, black, standard, deluxe and logo-personalised models.


For more details, please click here

Slippers for all Sizes and Sensibilities
Tranquil Nights with Inexpensive Mattress Pads Mattress protectors
Tranquil Nights with Inexpensive Mattress Pads Mattress protectors

Tranquil Nights with Inexpensive Mattress Pads Mattress protectors are a real hygiene problem for hotels.

– Fortunately, economical and practical solutions exist.

– An end to stains, hair or other cleaning issues, these pads can be used for over a month without a change.

– Disposable, meaning time and money saved by removing the chore of washing.

Sold in sets starting at 25 units

– for more information, please click here

For our full range of products or a free estimate, please visit disposable-linen.co.uk , or call020 7193 0887.
Copyright © www.caractere-paris.com

Vakker og Fredelig, Fjorder i Norge: Hiking Norway’s Fjords in Comfort and Style

from Caractère Paris

A Cruiseship in Molde, Romsdal

The coasts of the Scandinavian countries, and those of Norway in particular, are world renown for their spectacular fjords and incomparable views. More often than not, visitors opt to experience their magnificence from below, either on coastline cruise boats or in small canoes. However, as experienced hiker Bill Russell points out, taking “hikes into the surrounding mountains… really provides the visitor the fullest opportunity to experience the beauty and culture of the area in a special way not available by boats alone… it’s a glorious experience viewing the fjords from above.” In fact, he goes as far as to say, “Fjord hiking is the experience of a lifetime.” With over 15,000 miles of coastline and thousands of fjords, fortunately one could never run out of new sites to explore.

from Caractère Paris

Meloyfjord Sunset from Amnes

Sounds intriguing, no? If unfamiliar, you might be wondering what a fjord is exactly and about the origin of their funny name. The word “fjord” comes from Indo-European origins, with fara meaning travelling or ferrying. The Old Norse adaptation of this verb, fjǫrðr (or fjord) indicates a body of water that resembles a lake, often used for cruise and ferry ship transit. In geological terms, the name defines a lengthy, thin inlet surrounded by cliffs of steep hills or mountains. Fjords were created thanks to thousands of years of glacial melting since the last ice age. In fact, as the glaciers melted, through the abrasive pressure exerted by their weight on the land below the ice, the glaciers carved out deep tunnels. After they melted, these tunnels eventually became submerged by the sea. At the same time, this intense pressure pushed the surrounding land upward, creating the picturesque views that enthuse many a traveller to visit Norway today.

from Caractère Paris

Bergen from the Fløibanen Funicular

Often, hikers begin their voyages in Bergen, considered by many one of the world’s most beautiful cities and the “gateway to the fjord country.” Rich in an elegant mix of classic Norwegian style and the new minimalist Scan school of architecture, with plenty of cultural institutions, Norway’s second largest city has enough to offer on its own to be worth a visit. However, it’s the city’s proximity to the fjords that interests most tourists.

from Caractère Paris

Sognefjord, Norway, just outside of Bergen

Given the mountainous terrain, one can expect to travel an average of five to eight miles (11-18 km) per day. Waterfalls, rolling streams and quaint cabins line the journey. From Bergen, one can reach Sognefjord in a day, the world’s third longest fjord (the longest in Norway) at 203 km (136 mi) and the second deepest (again, the record holder for Norway) at 1,308 m (4,291 ft). The surrounding  mountains rise another 1,000 metres (3,281 miles), providing unrivalled views of the coast from every perspective. However, don’t let what sounds like a steep incline intimidate you — there are hiking paths available for every fitness level, from the professional to the amateur.

from Caractère Paris

Geirangerfjord, Norway

Further north along the coast, the Atlantic road continues along some of the country’s most beautiful and lesser known fjords. The Troll’s Road, Trollstigen, was a feat of modern engineering when constructed. It cuts directly into the Andalsnes mountain with hairpin turns, surrounded by waterfalls that have been described as “simply breathtaking.” Trollstigen leads to Geiranger, where many view the remarkable Geirangfjord from boat. Experienced travellers boast that the best vistas are from the trails north of Hellyslt. While in the area, the neighbouring Strynevatnet Lake contains gorgeous waters of a unique turquoise colour that cannot be found elsewhere. Also, the peaceful rural town of Hjelle serves as a perfect point to stop and rest.

from Caractère Paris

Sørfjord and Lofthus in Hardanger

One cannot go wrong by continuing along the Panorama Road, which wraps around the Gamle Strynefellsvegen fjord a third of a mile above sea level with stunningly picturesque views. Not to miss: the Kjenndal, Loen, Olden and Briksdal Glaciers. The nearby Saebo and Hjorundfjord sport some of the most remarkable views in all of Norway. With an extremely steep incline (nearly vertical), one is left with the feeling of floating on top of the world. The Highway 60 that passes by Geirangerfjord and Sunnylvsfjord sports what has the reputation of “one of the best vista spots in Norway.” Vinnufossen, in the neighbouring region of Sunndalsora, is the sixth tallest waterfall in the world. The gorgeous, protected Amotan Park will help visitors reconnect with nature, in addition to offering more scenic valleys with impressive waterfalls and a highly recommended hiking trail, the Trodalen.

from Caractère Paris

Stigen Farm, Aurlandsfjord

If you have yet to book the next flight to Oslo, listen to a short excerpt of one hiker’s experience of the fjords: “We hike past mountain farms, similar to the one situated 600 meters above Simadalsfjorden and only reachable by foot until the beginning of the 1970’s. We glimpse these old farm houses, where you can see how your ancestors used to live, and where it is still possible to meet people who protect the local song heritage by singing the old tunes, and by playing the Hardangerfiddle.

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Mountain pasture on the Geiranger Fjord

“As we hike along the heritage trails in Ulvik, in the hills and mountains that surround the village, you get to know more about life in the area in the days gone by. The trails beckon and the high pastures where flocks of sheep graze, clear streams, blue lakes, and striking mountains provide hikers with plenty of off-the-beaten track adventures.”

Sounds delightful! At Caractère, we offer a variety of items to make your fjord hiking experience easier and more comfortable. Our products include supplies designed for rural guest houses and camp sites, which range from disposable sheets and blankets to towels and baby hygiene products. For those who plan to take advantage of Scandinavia’s world renown saunas and spas, we also provide massage wear, slippers, sandals, bathrobes and towels. Comfortable, recyclable and easy to use, you cannot go wrong with disposable supplies from Caractère. Best of all, we ship anywhere in Europe, including the UK and Norway. If you choose to go, have a wonderful trip and please write to us about your travels.
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Finally, some links to help you plan. For hiking route ideas and itineraries, see the hiking and itinerary pages of Norway Fjords, Fjords.com, REI, FjordNorway, Russell Tours and Web Walking. For guided hiking tours, visit The Norwegian Trekking Association’s official website. For more fantastic pictures of fjords, see The Norway Fjords and Fjords.com.

Finally, a short video about hiking in the fjords from Visit Kristiansund: